Before Moving in Together: Legal Considerations

Law

People who are moving in together may have legal rights and responsibilities. See the sections below to learn about:

  • Joint ownership of property (including joint bank accounts)
  • Joint debts and guarantees
  • Joint names on leases and bills
  • What “joint tenancy” and “tenancy in common” are
  • An introduction to cohabitation agreements for people moving in together

Please read “Who is this Information Page for?” just below to make sure you are on the right page.

LegalAve provides general legal information, not legal advice. Learn more here.

Last Reviewed: July 2016
Who is this Information Page for?

This Information Page contains legal information intended for people who are thinking about living together in a romantic relationship. However, it can also apply to people who are not in a romantic relationship: for example, long-term roommates who are otherwise very committed to each other.

Moving in together is a big step, and it will lead to legal changes in your life. Many people believe that if they are only moving in together, and not getting married, there will be no legal changes. That is not true: there can be serious legal consequences as a result of moving in together.

For example: both members of the couple may sign a rental agreement for a new shared apartment. Or, one may move into the other’s apartment without signing anything. Each of these options have different legal consequences that you should be aware of before taking any steps.

Be Aware

If you have already been living together for one year, or already live together and have a child together, you are considered “common-law” partners under federal laws. For more information about what that means, see the Living Together: Common-law Partnerships & Adult Interdependent Relationships Information Page.

You are currently on the Law tab of this Information Page, which has information about the law in Alberta. There is also important information in the Common Questions and Myths tabs above.

The law and legal system are complex: this will take a while. Be sure to give yourself enough time to read the information below, understand how it applies to your situation, and know what actions you may need to take.

The first topic is What the words mean. Please read this section even if you think you already know what the words mean. In order to understand the resources on this page, you will need to understand the legal terms.

What the words mean

These words are not listed alphabetically—they are in the order that makes it easiest to understand the complete legal picture.

If you are looking for a specific term, you can use the Glossary, which is in alphabetical order.

federal law

Laws that are made by the Government of Canada and apply to all Canadians, no matter which province they live in. Examples include: the Income Tax Act, the Criminal Code of Canada, and the Immigration Act.

provincial law

Laws that are made by a provincial or territorial government. In Alberta, provincial laws are made by the Government of Alberta and apply only in Alberta. Examples include: the Alberta Adult Interdependent Relationship Act, the Alberta Family Law Act, and the Alberta Wills and Succession Act.

“common-law” partner

In Alberta, the term “common-law” only applies to certain couples and only for certain federal laws (such as the Income Tax Act). Under most federal laws, the term “common-law” refers to a couple who has lived together in a romantic relationship:

  • for at least one year; or
  • for less than one year but they have a child together.

Under Alberta’s provincial laws, there is no such thing as “common-law” partners and “common-law” relationships. In Alberta, similar rights and responsibilities come from being in an “Adult Interdependent Relationship” (see below).


Be Aware

Under the federal Indian Act and the federal Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act, the term “common-law” is used only for a couple who has been living together in a romantic relationship for at least one year (regardless of whether or not they have had a child together).

Adult Interdependent Relationship (AIR)

The term used in Alberta to describe what many people might think of as a “common-law” relationship.

A person is in an Adult Interdependent Relationship if he or she has been living with and in a “relationship of interdependence” with another person:

  • for 3 years; or
  • for less than 3 years if they have signed an Adult Interdependent Partner Agreement (see below); or
  • for less than 3 years if they have a child together (by birth or adoption).

A “relationship of interdependence” is a relationship where the partners are not married but they:

  • share one another’s lives;
  • are emotionally committed to one another; and
  • function as an economic and domestic unit.

The relationship does not have to be romantic or sexual to meet these requirements; it can be non-romantic (also called “platonic”). For information about non-romantic AIRs, see the Non-romantic Adult Interdependent Relationships Information Page.

Adult Interdependent Partner (AIP)

A person who is in an Adult Interdependent Relationship with another person (see above).

Adult Interdependent Partner Agreement (AIPA)

A written contract in which 2 adults agree to become Adult Interdependent Partners. That contract must be in the form required by the Alberta Adult Interdependent Partner Agreement Regulation—see the following resource.

PDF Adult Interdependent Partner Agreement Regulation
Government of Alberta
English

conjugal

A word used to describe a relationship—a “conjugal relationship” means the people involved have sex. This is also called a “romantic relationship.” This is different from a “platonic relationship,” which is a relationship of any kind that does not include having sex.

cohabitation

Living together in the same home.

cohabitation agreement

A contract created by 2 or more people who live together, or are about to live together, but are not married (and not planning on getting married in the near future). In this agreement the parties can address many issues, such as:

  • how bills will be divided between the parties;
  • whether one party will pay partner support to the other if they were to separate; and
  • how property will be divided between the parties if they were to separate.

jurisdiction

A particular government’s right, power, or authority to make laws. The Government of Canada has “federal jurisdiction.” The laws made by the Government of Canada apply to everyone in Canada. On the other hand, the provinces and territories of Canada have “provincial jurisdiction.” The laws made by those governments apply only within that province or territory. The exact topics that each jurisdiction can make laws about is set out in Canada’s Constitution Act, 1867.

property (also called “assets”)

Something that you own. Property can be:

  • “personal” property, such as bank accounts or vehicles; or
  • “real property,” such as land, a house, or a condominium.

debt

Money that is owed to another person, bank, or company. For example:

  • a loan;
  • the amount owed on your credit cards; or
  • something you are still making payments on (such as the living room furniture that you have another 18 months to pay off).


The state of owing money is called being “in debt.”

joint tenancy

When 2 or more people own all of an asset together, that property is held in “joint tenancy.” Each person involved is called a “joint tenant.” For example: a joint bank account. Under joint tenancy, all of the joint tenants own all of the money in the bank account (not just their “share”). If one of the joint tenants dies, the entire account goes to the surviving joint tenant(s): the property is not part of the deceased’s estate.

tenancy in common

When 2 or more people own an asset together, but each owns a portion, that property is held in “tenancy in common.” Each person involved is called a “tenant in common.” For example: land. Under tenancy in common, each of the tenants owns a portion (or share) of the value of the land. If one of the tenants in common dies, that person’s portion does not automatically go to the other owner(s). Instead, that portion goes through the Will of the deceased.

guarantee

An agreement you sign that makes you responsible for repaying someone else’s loan. You will not be responsible unless that person has missed payments or is otherwise unable to pay back the loan.

If you agree to be responsible for another person’s debt in this way, you are called a “guarantor.”

Be Aware

“Co-signing” a loan and “guaranteeing” a loan are very similar concepts. Both involve becoming legally responsible for someone else’s loan if that other person is not able to pay. The difference is when you can become responsible. If you guarantee a loan, the lender must try to get payment from the borrower before going after you for payment. If you co-sign for a loan, you have agreed to be as responsible for the loan as the borrower. This means that the lender can come after you for repayment at the same time as they go after the borrower. They may even come after you before going after the borrower, but that is not common.

co-signing

Putting your name on an official document, such as a loan or contract, together with someone else. When a person co-signs for a loan, they are just as responsible for the loan as the person who borrowed the money. For example: a parent might co-sign a loan with their child. If the child misses a payment, the bank can make the parent pay back the whole loan immediately.

A person who co-signs a loan is called a “co-signer.”

Be Aware

“Co-signing” a loan and “guaranteeing” a loan are very similar concepts. Both involve becoming legally responsible for someone else’s loan if that other person is not able to pay. The difference is when you can become responsible. If you guarantee a loan, the lender must try to get payment from the borrower before going after you for payment. If you co-sign for a loan, you have agreed to be as responsible for the loan as the borrower. This means that the lender can come after you for repayment at the same time as they go after the borrower. They may even come after you before going after the borrower, but that is not common.

How does the law describe your relationship?

When people who are in a romantic relationship move in together, they often start to call each other “common-law partners.” Legally, this is not accurate. If you have been together for less than a year, the law does not have a term to describe your relationship. More specifically:

  • When you first move in together, and if you do not have a child together, you do not qualify as “common-law” partners under federal law. Similarly, if you do not have child together, or have not signed an Adult Interdependent Partner Agreement, you do not qualify as Adult Interdependent Partners under Alberta law.
  • Once you live together for one year, or have a child together, you will qualify as “common-law” partners under federal law. Once you live together for 3 years (or have a child together, or sign an Adult Interdependent Partner Agreement), you will qualify as Adult Interdependent Partners under Alberta law.

During the time that you do not qualify as either “common-law” partners (under federal law) or Adult Interdependent Partners (under Alberta law), there is no law that describes your relationship, and no law that gives you any rights or protections related to your relationship.

For more information about being “common-law” partners under federal law or Adult Interdependent Partners under Alberta law, please see the Living Together: Common-law Partnerships & Adult Interdependent Relationships Information Page.

Be Aware

There is also no specific legal term for people who are committed to one another, but not in a romantic relationship, when they move in together. However, such people can become non-romantic Adult Interdependent Partners. For more information, please see the Non-romantic Adult Interdependent Relationships Information Page.

Understanding “joint” ownership and debt

As you now know, simply moving in together does not make you “common-law partners” under federal law, nor does it automatically make you “Adult Interdependent Partners” under Alberta law.

However, this does not mean that the steps you take when moving in with your partner will have no legal consequences.

One of the biggest changes that may come up when people move in together is doing things “jointly.” For example, having a joint bank account or owning a car together. This can have very serious legal consequences, even if you are not “common-law partners” or “Adult Interdependent Partners.”

Joint bank accounts

When couples move in together, they often open a joint bank account. Sometimes, this new joint account is only for joint expenses such as rent and utility bills, and each member of the couple also keeps their personal accounts. However, sometimes each member of the couple closes their personal accounts and the couple only has the joint account. In this case, all income (such as each person’s paycheque) goes into the joint account and all expenses come out of it.

Although joint bank accounts are very handy, they can also be very dangerous. Joint bank accounts are bank accounts that belong to 2 or more people. These people are called “joint tenants.” Under joint tenancy, all of the joint tenants own all of the money in the bank account (not just their “share”).

If you and your partner decided to open a joint bank account when you moved in together, you would both own all of the money in that account. This means that, at any time, one of you could go to the bank and take out all of the money. As a joint tenant, you (or your partner) would be legally allowed to do this.

If one of the joint tenants dies, the other joint tenant becomes the sole owner of the property. The property would not pass through the deceased’s Will, even if they wanted it to.

When joint tenants separate, joint accounts are usually divided equally. You may have been the one who put all the money in the joint account. But if you later separate your former partner can insist on getting half of the balance of the account.

For more information about joint accounts, see the following resources.

Web Joint or Separate Accounts? That is the Question
Young and Thrifty
English
This is a private source. Learn more here.

Web Do's and don'ts of joint credit
CreditCards.com Canada
English
This is a private source. Learn more here.

Web Joint Tenants or Tenants in Common?
Public Legal Education Association of Saskatchewan
English
This resource is from outside Alberta. Learn more here.

Web Joint Accounts and Survivorship Rights
Advisor Group
English
This is a private source. Learn more here.

Web The Trouble With Joint Bank Accounts
Huffington Post Canada
English



Web Joint accounts
Government of Canada
English

French resources



Web Compte conjoint
Government of Canada
French

Other joint assets

The concept of “joint” ownership does not only apply to bank accounts. It can apply to any asset. For example: a home or a car. When you purchase something together, you may want to keep the receipts and documents in a safe place. Then, if necessary, you will have proof that it was jointly purchased.

If you jointly purchase an asset with another person:

  • you both own all of it;
  • either of you can sell it at any time (without even telling the other owner);
  • if one of you dies, the other automatically gets it; and
  • if you separate, there is a risk that it will be divided equally (even if both owners did not equally contribute to buying it).

The situation is similar if you buy a house or condominium together. However, with a jointly owned house or condominium, your partner cannot sell it without your knowledge.

Joint debts

The concept of “joint” also applies to debts. As a result, any debt with your name on it is your responsibility to pay. And that can mean to pay all of it.

Example:

  • Alex and Taylor took out a loan together to buy a car.
  • They end up separating before the loan is paid off.
  • In dividing their property, they decide that Alex will keep the car. Taylor trusts that Alex will make the remaining car payments.
  • Alex moves away and stops making the car payments. Because the loan company cannot find Alex, they come after Taylor for the amount left on the loan. They can do this because Taylor’s name is still on the loan even though Taylor does not have the car.

The same is true of joint credit cards (like Visa and Mastercard), joint store cards (like Sears or the Bay), joint lines of credit, and joint “buy-now-pay-later” loans (for example: financing furniture or electronics). If your name is on it, you can be held responsible for paying for all of it.

For more information, see the following resources.

PDF Know your responsibilities as a joint borrower
Government of Canada
English


Web Are you responsible for your partner's debt?
TVA Publications
English
This is a private source. Learn more here.

Web Avoiding authorized user nightmares
CreditCards.com Canada
English
This is a private source. Learn more here.

Web Should You Have a Joint Credit Card or an Authorized User?
Macmillan Holdings, LLC
English
This is a private source. Learn more here.

Web 5 ways credit can complicate your relationship
CreditCards.com Canada
English
This is a private source. Learn more here.

Web 7 myths about joint credit cards
CreditCards.com Canada
English
This is a private source. Learn more here.

PDF Dealing with credit
Government of Alberta
English
See p. 3.

PDF What Creditors Can Do If You Don't Pay
Government of Alberta
English

Sharing debt as a co-signer or a guarantor

Another way that you could be “jointly” responsible for a debt is by co-signing or guaranteeing a loan.

When a person “co-signs” a loan for a person who is borrowing money (a “borrower”), it means that they are agreeing to be as responsible for the loan as the borrower is.

When a person “guarantees” a loan for a borrower, it means that they are agreeing to pay back the loan if the borrower does not pay off the loan as planned.

Both co-signing and guaranteeing involve becoming legally responsible for someone else’s loan if they are not able to pay. The difference is when you can become responsible.

  • If you co-sign for a loan, you agree to be as responsible for the loan as the borrower. This means that the lender can go to you for repayment at the same time as they go to the borrower, or even before going to the borrower.
  • If you guarantee a loan, you agree to pay off the rest of the loan if the borrower is unable or unwilling to. This means that the lender must try to get payment from the borrower before coming to you for payment.

For example:

  • Alex wants to take out a loan for $30,000. The bank is not confident that Alex will be able to make the payments. They ask Alex to get someone to guarantee the loan.
  • Taylor agrees to be the guarantor.
  • For a year all goes well and Alex makes regular payments. Then Alex has some problems with his business. Unknown to Taylor, Alex misses 2 loan payments.
  • The bank declares that Alex has broken the loan agreement. The loan is in default.
  • Taylor has guaranteed the loan. Therefore, they demand that Taylor pay them the full $15,000 that is still owed on the loan.

For more information on being a co-signer or guarantor, see the following resource and the Financial Issues between Family Members Information Page.

Web Credit
Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
English
See “What If I Am Asked to Co-Sign A Loan?”

Joint names on rental agreements and bills

When you move in together, you may sign a joint rental agreement for your home. Or, you may have both of your names on your utility bills (such as heating, electricity, water, telephone, cable, or internet).

If your name is on it, you are responsible for paying it. This often surprises people when they separate and move out of the joint home. They think they will be free from these expenses. This can be an extra problem for rental agreements, because you can be held responsible for the actions of your former partner and any new roommate he or she may get after you leave (such as damage to the home).

For more information about the laws that may affect you as a tenant, see the following resources.

Web Laws for Landlords & Tenants in Alberta
Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
English

Web Landlord and Tenant Law
Student Legal Services of Edmonton
English

PDF Information for Tenants
Government of Alberta
English

Tenancy in common

In addition to “joint tenancy,” there is a second way of owning something with someone else: “tenancy in common.” If you own an asset with another person as “tenants in common,” you each own half of it. If one of you dies, that person’s half does not automatically go to the other owner. Instead, that half goes through the Will of the deceased.

For more information, see the following resources.

Web Joint Tenants or Tenants in Common?
Public Legal Education Association of Saskatchewan
English
This resource is from outside Alberta. Learn more here.

Web Shared Ownership of Property
Seniors First BC
English
This resource is from outside Alberta. Learn more here.

Web What happens when a tenant-in-common dies?
Estate Law Canada
English
This resource is a private source. Learn more here.

What this means for you and your partner

Given all of the above, it is important that you carefully consider how you set up the bank accounts and other financial issues when you move in together. There is no one solution that works for everyone—together you must work out what works best for your relationship, and remain aware that you need to protect yourselves as well.

Be Aware

It is important to understand how your property (joint and non-joint) will be treated under the law if you later separate. This will depend on whether or not you ever married each other. Specifically, if you get married, the starting position for property division is that all the property and debt that was acquired during the time of the marriage should be split equally (regardless of whose name it is in). For non-married partners, however, the starting position is that whoever legally “owned” the property or debt will get it. This is something to keep in mind as you move forward through your relationship.

For more information, see the following resources.

PDF Couples and Money
Money Mentors
English

Web Living as a couple
Government of Canada
English

Web Vivre en couple
Government of Canada
French

Web Condo Law for Albertans
Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
English
Be Aware

For many people, pets are members of their family. The law, however, views pets as property. This means that pets can also be jointly “owned.” Or they can be “owned” by only one of the partners.

Understanding “single name" ownership and debt

There can be advantages to having some assets under the single ownership of each partner. And, there can be major disadvantages to having everything in one partner’s name. A few examples are given below.

Having things in your own name can help build your credit rating.

By regularly paying bills as they come due, you show that you can handle small amounts of credit. This is necessary if you ever need to qualify for larger amounts of credit. However, if you have only owned things jointly with your partner, there is no record that you can manage payments on your own. You will not have a credit rating. This could be a problem if your partner dies, or if you separate from your partner in the future. You may not qualify if you need to get a loan or a credit card.

Owning property in your own name means that you are free to deal with it as you please. You can give it away, sell it, or use it for collateral on a loan without needing permission from your partner. In contrast, with joint property you would usually want to only act with the consent of your partner. Although legally you can sometimes act on your own with joint property (for example, with joint bank accounts), it could cause a lot of conflict with your partner if you do.

By having bank accounts, property, or investments in your own name, you will keep up your money management skills. This can be important if you ever end up on your own because your partner dies or your relationship ends.

You are responsible for purchases made on your credit card account. This includes purchases made by your partner using a secondary card. You may have a credit card account that is in your name, but your partner is listed as an “authorized user” or “secondary cardholder.” There are 2 actual cards for the account. Your partner uses the second card. As the “primary cardholder,” you are responsible for all of the purchases made on that card, even if they were not made by you. However, you also have the right to cancel that card if you need to. For example:

  • if your partner overspends on the card;
  • if your partner makes purchases that you do not agree with; or
  • if the relationship ends.
Remember

A debt that is only in your name is your sole responsibility.

For more information, see the following resource.

Web Joint credit cards
Government of Canada
English

Web Carte de crédit conjointe
Government of Canada
French
Substitute decision-making

Many people living in a marriage-like relationship assume that if they become incapable of making their own decisions, their partner can just take over. They believe that medical staff, banks, and other service providers would simply take direction from their partner (this is called “substitute decision-making”). As a result of this belief, they do not complete the legal paperwork required to give their partner this authority.

This belief is wrong. Alberta law does not have any such automatic default position. 

For example:

  • You are injured in an accident and you are left in a coma. Your partner wants to make your medical decisions.
  • If you had thought about it in advance, you would have wanted your partner to make decisions for you. But you did not leave any paperwork saying that. No one can ask you now, as you are in a coma.
  • Your parent or adult child arrives at the hospital and thinks that he or she should make the decisions instead of your partner.
  • To solve the issue, your loved ones will have to go to court and ask the judge to appoint a decision-maker. This costs time and money, and can be very emotional for everyone.

To plan for a time when you will no longer be able make decisions for yourself, there are two different legal documents that are required:

  1. a Power of Attorney, which is for financial decisions; and
  2. a Personal Directive, which is for all other decisions.

If you live in a marriage-like relationship, it is important to create these documents, and to review them as your needs change. For example: when you first move in together, you may still want a person other than your partner to be your substitute decision-maker. However, when you have lived together longer, you might change your mind.

For an introduction to these documents, see the following resources.

PDF Making a Personal Directive in Alberta
Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
English

PDF Making an Enduring Power of Attorney
Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
English

Video Personal Directives
Government of Alberta
English
Be Aware

A separation does not necessarily affect a Power of Attorney and a Personal Directive. In other words, if you separate, your ex-partner might still be able to make decisions for you. If you separate, be sure to sign new documents.

For more detailed information, see the Planning for Illness Information Page.

Wills

Many people who live in a marriage-like relationship assume that if they die without a Will (also called dying “intestate”), their partner will simply get everything. This is not the case.

When you first move in together, you may not want to leave your new partner everything in your Will. However, when you have lived together longer, you might change your mind.

To plan for what will happen to your things when you die, you will want to write a Will. If you live in a marriage-like relationship, it is important to create this document, and to review it as your life changes. For an introduction to the topic, including information about what occurs if you die without a Will, see the following resource.

PDF Making a Will
Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
English
Be Aware

A separation does not necessarily affect a Will. In other words, if you do not sign a new Will after you separate, your ex-partner might still benefit. If you separate, be sure to sign a new Will.

For more detailed information see, the Planning for Death Information Page.

Death & “Designation of Beneficiary” forms

When a person dies, much of what they own goes into their estate to be dealt with in their Will. But there are certain types of things that do not pass through the Will. Instead, they go directly to a specific person. This includes assets and policies that are left to someone (called the “beneficiary”) because that person is named on a “Designation of Beneficiary” form.

Examples include:

  • Life insurance: when you purchase life insurance, you fill out a Designation of Beneficiary form indicating who will get the money (the “benefit”) when you die.
  • Pension plans: if you have a “pension partner,” he or she gets the benefits. However, if you have no pension partner, the death benefit goes to the person that you named on the Designation of Beneficiary form. For more information about pension partners, see the Living Together: Common-law Partnerships & Adult Interdependent Relationships Information Page.
  • Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs): when you set up an RRSP, you are asked to sign a Designation of Beneficiary form. The person you name in that document gets the RRSP when you die.
  • Tax-free savings accounts (TFSAs): when you open a tax-free savings account, you will also be asked to complete a Designation of Beneficiary form. The person you name gets the balance of the account when you die.

When you are in a marriage-like relationship, you may or may not want to name your partner as a beneficiary on a Designation of Beneficiary form. This is something to think about when you move in together, and to reconsider as your relationship changes.

Be Aware

A separation does not affect your Designation of Beneficiary forms. In other words, if you do not sign a new form after you separate, your ex-partner will get the death benefit. If you separate, be sure to sign new Designation of Beneficiary forms.

For more information about Designation of Beneficiary forms, please see the following resources.

Web The Importance of Beneficiary Designations
Advisor Group
English
This resource is from a private source outside Alberta. Learn more here.

PDF Beneficiary Designations: Why, when and how?
Manulife Financial
English
This is a private source. Learn more here.

Web Designated beneficiaries
Government of Canada
English

PDF Understanding Insurance Basics
Government of Canada
English

Web Module 6. Insurance
Government of Canada
English


Web Bénéficiaires désignés
Government of Canada
French

PDF Mieux comprendre les assurances
Government of Canada
French

Web Module 6. Assurances
Government of Canada
French
Cohabitation agreements

A cohabitation agreement is a contract created by two people who are living together, or are about to start living together. In this agreement, the couple can address issues about what will happen while the couple lives together. For example: who does what for household chores, and who pays for what. A cohabitation agreement can also address issues that may come up if the couple later separates, such as partner support and how property will be divided between the partners.

For detailed information, see the Cohabitation Agreements Information Page.

For information about what occurs with a cohabitation agreement when a non-married couple separates, see Relationship Breakdown if You Had a Domestic Contract.

What this means if you separate

If you are not yet common-law or Adult Interdependent Partners, there are no legal requirements or protections if you break up. You can simply move out—no official paperwork required. Depending on the decisions you made, you might have to remember to “undo” some financial and other arrangements to protect yourself.

A few things to keep in mind:

  • If you do not have a cohabitation agreement, have an exit plan. For example: who keeps the apartment if you break up? Will the person moving out find a new roommate for the person staying? What will happen with the security deposit on the apartment?
  • Know the signs of family violence. See the What is Family Violence? Information Page for more information.
  • Save enough money for a few months’ rent in case you need to support yourself alone after a breakup.
  • If required, remember to change your Power of Attorney, Personal Directive, Will, and Designation of Beneficiary forms.
  • Make sure that joint assets and debts are properly dealt with.

Process

There is no specific “process” to follow before moving in together. Please see the Law tab of this Information Page for general information about moving in together in Alberta.

Last Reviewed: May 2016

Provincial Court

Queen's Bench

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